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CLEP Common Literary Forms And Genres

Subjects : clep, literature
Instructions:
  • Answer 50 questions in 15 minutes.
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  • Match each statement with the correct term.
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This is a study tool. The 3 wrong answers for each question are randomly chosen from answers to other questions. So, you might find at times the answers obvious, but you will see it re-enforces your understanding as you take the test each time.
1. Fiction that concerns the nature of fiction itself - either by reinterpreting a previous fictional work or by drawing attention to its own fictional status.






2. A play such as Shakespeare's A Winter's Tale that mixes elements of tragedy and comedy.






3. A full-length fictional work that is novelistic in nature but written in verse rather than prose. Examples include Aleksandr Pushkin's Eugene Onegin and Vikram Seth's The Golden Gate.






4. A particularly compressed and truncated short story. They are rarely longer than 1 -000 words.






5. Bertolt Brecht's Marxist approach to theater - which rejects emotional and psychological engagement in favor of critical detachment.






6. A novel written in the form of letters exchanged by characters in the story - such as Samuel Richardson's Clarissa or Alice Walker's The Color Purple. This form was especially popular in the 1700s.






7. The brief narration of a single event or incident.






8. A play written in the fifteenth or sixteenth centuries that presents an allegory of the Christian struggle for salvation.






9. A narrative work that reports true events.






10. A short pastoral poem in the form of a dialogue between two shepherds. Virgil's Eclogues is the most famous example of this genre.






11. A formal poem that laments the death of a friend or public figure - or - occasionally - a meditation on death itself. In Greek and Latin poetry - the term applies to a specific type of meter (alternating hexameters and pentameters) regardless of cont






12. Any composition not written in verse.






13. A novel that tells a nonfictional - autobiographical story but uses novelistic techniques - such as fictionalized dialogue or anecdotes - to add color - immediacy - or thematic unity.






14. Originally - a realistic novel detailing a scoundrel's exploits. The term grew to refer more generally to any novel with a loosely structured - episodic plot that revolves around the adventures of a central character.






15. A novel - such as Jean-Paul Sartre's Nausea - that the author uses as a platform for discussing ideas. Character and plot are of secondary importance.






16. A short play based on a biblical story.






17. A work that imitates the style of a previous author - work - or literary genre. Alternatively - the term may refer to a work that contains a hodgepodge of elements or fragments from different sources or influences. It differs from parody in that its






18. Works that express a preference for the natural over the artificial in human culture - and a belief that the life of primitive cultures is preferable to modern lifestyles.






19. A novel set in an earlier historical period that features a plot shaped by the historical circumstances of that period.






20. A form of nonfictional discussion or argument that Michel de Montaigne pioneered in the 1500s.






21. A work of fiction of middle length - often divided into a few short chapters - such as Henry James's Daisy Miller.






22. The nonfictional story of a person's life - told by that person.






23. A German term - meaning 'formation novel -' for a novel about a child or adolescent's development into maturity - with special focus on the protagonist's quest for identity. James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is a notable example.






24. A novel that focuses on the social customs of a certain class of people - often with a sharp eye for irony. Jane Austen's novels are prime examples of this genre.






25. A lengthy narrative that describes the deeds of a heroic figure - often of national or cultural importance - in elevated language. Strictly - the term applies only to verse narratives like Beowulf or Virgil's Aeneid - but it is used to describe prose






26. The nonfictional story of a person's life. James Boswell's Life of Johnson is one of the most celebrated examples.






27. Traditionally - a folk song telling a story or legend in simple language - often with a refrain.






28. A poem that contains words that a fictional or historical character speaks to a particular audience. Alfred - Lord Tennyson's 'Ulysses' is a famous example.






29. A succinct - witty statement - often in verse. For example - William Wordsworth's observation 'The child is the father of the man.'






30. A genre of fiction that presents an imagined future society that purports to be perfect and utopian but that the author presents to the reader as horrifyingly inhuman.






31. A serious lyric poem - often of significant length - that usually conforms to an elaborate metrical structure.






32. A narrative in which literal meaning corresponds clearly and directly to symbolic meaning. For example - the literal story in John Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress






33. A nonrealistic story - in verse or prose - that features idealized characters - improbable adventures - and exotic settings.






34. A short poetic expression of grief. It differs from an elegy in that it often is embedded within a larger work - is less highly structured - and is meant to be sung.






35. A form of high-energy comedy that plays on confusions and deceptions between characters and features a convoluted and fast-paced plot.






36. A humorous imitation of a serious work of literature. The humor often arises from the incongruity between the imitation and the work being imitated. For example - Alexander Pope's The Rape of the Lock uses the high diction of epic poetry to talk abou






37. A poetic work that features the strong rhythms of free versebut is presented on the page in the form of prose - without line breaks.






38. A composition that is meant to be performed. The term often is used interchangeably with play.






39. A short narrative that illustrates a moral by means of allegory.






40. Fiction that is set in an alternative reality






41. A concise expression of insight or wisdom: 'The vanity of others offends our taste only when it offends our vanity' (Friedrich Nietzsche - Beyond Good and Evil).






42. A celebration of the simple - rustic life of shepherds and shepherdesses - usually written by a sophisticated - urban writer.






43. An autobiographical poetic genre in which the poet discusses intensely personal subject matter with unusual frankness.






44. Literature intended to instruct or educate. For example - Virgil's Georgics contains farming advice in verse form.






45. A serious play that ends unhappily for the protagonist.






46. An autobiographical work. Rather than focus exclusively on the author's life - it pays significant attention to the author's involvement in historical events and the characterization of individuals other than the author.






47. A speech - often in verse - by a lone character. The most famous example being the 'To be or not to be' speech in Shakespeare's Hamlet.






48. A play from the Middle Ages featuring saints or miraculous appearances by the Virgin Mary.






49. A story about the origins of a culture's beliefs and practices - or of supernatural phenomena - usually derived from oral tradition and set in an imagined supernatural past.






50. Disturbing or absurd material presented in a humorous manner - usually with the intention to confront uncomfortable truths. Joseph Heller's Catch-22 is a notable example.