Test your basic knowledge |

Journalism Law

Instructions:
  • Answer 50 questions in 15 minutes.
  • If you are not ready to take this test, you can study here.
  • Match each statement with the correct term.
  • Don't refresh. All questions and answers are randomly picked and ordered every time you load a test.

This is a study tool. The 3 wrong answers for each question are randomly chosen from answers to other questions. So, you might find at times the answers obvious, but you will see it re-enforces your understanding as you take the test each time.
1. As long as speech was about a public official (figure) could not reasonably be construed to state actual facts about its subject - it is protected by the first amendment.






2. For the purpose of defamation - a person who does not have regular - continuing access to the media - or on matters of public controversy. These individuals have a lesser burden of proof under most state libel laws.






3. Words that may be innocent on face - but facts make story damaging






4. In an invasion of privacy tort - an action that characterizes a person falsely. Often the person is misrepresented by quoting out of context - the careless use of photos or cutlines - or by using a picture from one story as a picture for another.






5. Michigan is in ____ district court in ____ -____






6. Newspaper must have known material falsity - material falsity became standard of proof in Michigan.






7. Newspapers do not have an equal time requirement like broadcast has.






8. Under FOIA - personell records may be released - subject to 'appropriate redactions.'






9. in an invasion of privacy tort - an action which occurs when an individual's expectation of privacy or right to be left alone is breached. EX. A reporter lies about his identity to gain access to information they couldn't under normal conditions.






10. Even though university foundations are privately incorporated - they might be subject to comply with FOIA and OMA if the majority of funding comes from the university.






11. Federal if between two states (although try to get it back to states) - telecommunications - crossing state lines - anything violating state law






12. Upon the request of the counsel or the victim - you can order that the names of the victim and actor and details of the alleged offense be suppressed until such time as the actor is arraigned - the charge is dismissed - or the case is otherwise concl






13. Permission given by SCOTUS to allow a case to be appealed






14. This protects the media from liability of defamatory statements made during official proceedings. The published story must be a fair and accurate account of what happened.






15. Only in Massachusetts - you can close a preliminary hearing if the case is a sexual assault case.






16. Money damages awarded to the injured party as compensation for a specific loss






17. (Privacy) Ex. Kim Kardashian's sex tape






18. Publication - identification - defamation - harm and damages






19. Qualified privilege allows newspapers to report on both sides of a story as long as the sources are qualified. Created doctrine of neutral reportage






20. A person vs. a person (corporation can be a person too






21. The right to exploit one's name and likeness is personal to the artist and must be exercised - if at all - by him during his lifetime.' This resulted in a loss of inheriting personality rights in California.






22. Private members of society are not required by the First Amendment to meet the 'actual malice' standard in order to recover damage.






23. Written defamation which causes injury to another's reputation






24. Harm done which the law cannot remedy.






25. Guarantees freedoms of speech - religion - press and assembly.






26. Michigan court trials have to remain open. Parts can be closed - but never all of the trial. M.C.L.A 750.520k only applies to pre-trial hearings.






27. The burden of proof imposed on public officials extends to anyone involved in a matter of public concern - regardless of whether they were famous or unknown.






28. US Supreme court allows inquiry into a reporters state of mind when making decisions about what to include and what not to include.






29. If you knowingly run ads that advocate criminal activity - you can be held liable. Got off on the first case - but on the second case they should have known better.






30. Friend of the court.






31. There is liability even if the news organization reports both sides - if the sources are not credible.






32. Prevents ISPs from liability except on copyright.






33. Guarantees people the right to be secure in their homes and property against unreasonable searches and seizures. Also protects against the issuance of a warrant without probable cause.






34. Minor errors do not count as actual malice.






35. The declaration of a final judgment based on the evidence presented






36. Broadcasters are immune from liability if political candidates defame someone while under section 315






37. Have to have an open meeting when interviewing candidates for a public position.






38. Judge has an absolute duty to ensure fair trial rights. Judge must be able to control what's going on in the courtroom.






39. If a statement 'results in a material change in the meaning conveyed by the statement -' the person who says it can be sued for libel.






40. A form of qualified privilege which gives the media the right to publish articles as long as opinions are based on relevent facts. These aretiles include opinion - columns - editorials - book reviews - movie reviews - etc.






41. Compensatory damages are a proper remedy to avoid the injustice under a promissory estoppel claim.






42. Under the language of the statute - these media representatives are not subject to an investigative subpoena.






43. An order issued by the court to prevent attorneys and witnesses from discussing the case outside the courtroom - or reporters from publishing information obtained during a court proceeding.






44. Michigan statute M.C.L.A. 750.520k violated the First - Fifth - and Fourteenth Amendments






45. A proper search warrant could be applied to a newspaper as well as to anyone else without necessarily violating the First Amendment rights to freedom of the press.






46. Published work of copyrighted material is a violation and isn't protected under Section 107 as 'fair use.'






47. Enforced freelancer/copyright actions - and publishers who were doing more than compile the stories had to pay the reporters. Electronic publications (putting it online) makes it a new publication.






48. Set the standard in MI that negligence is needed to prove libel - as the legislature had not acted.






49. Truth is only a defense in privacy cases when it's in a case of _______






50. Reading of the charges against a person